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Ft Bliss, TX · School of Education · Graduate Dept of Education

Technology, Ethics, and Society
EDTC-5900

  • SU 2016
  • Section 28
  • 3 Credits
  • 06/06/2016 to 07/29/2016
  • Modified 06/03/2016

Contact Information

EDTC 5900

Course Name: 

Technology, Ethics and Society

Term: Summer 2016

Site: Ft Bliss 

 

Instructor name/email: 

Adrian Ramirez

[email protected]

915-562-4400

 

3 credit hours

 

Description

Course Description:

This course will engage social ethics in response to its impact on the developing technologies of global societies.  Students will explore the idea that traditional concepts of ethics insist that people in social relationships be treated as ends, in and of themselves, and never as a means to the ends of others. Since all technologies evolve from our social relationships, no technology is value-free.  Because of the value-laden nature of technology, new technologies are characteristically defined as both socially-determinate and socially derived.

Outcomes

Course Outcomes

SOE Goals and ISTE Standards Addressed

Copyright, intellectual property and source documentation: Student will demonstrate an ability to advocate, model and teach safe, legal, and ethical use of digital information and technology, including the respect for copyright, intellectual property, and the appropriate documentation of sources.

  • NETS-T 4a

Learner Centered Strategies:  Students will demonstrate how to address the diverse needs of all learners by using learner-centered strategies and providing equitable access to appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • NETS-T 4b
  • SOE 1, 2, 4

Promote and model digital etiquette:  Students will demonstrate an ability to promote and model digital etiquette and responsible social interactions related to the use of technology and information.

  • NETS-T 4c
  • SOE 3, 4

Cultural understanding and global awareness:  Students will demonstrate an ability to develop and model cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with colleagues and students of other cultures using digital age communication and collaboration tools.

  • NETS-T 4d
  • SOE 3, 4

Use of global learning and communities to improve student learning:  Student will participate in local and global learning communities to explore creative applications of technology to improve student learning.

  • NETS-T 5a
  • SOE 2, 3, 4

Keeping current:  Students will evaluate and reflect on current research and professional practice in a regular basis to make effective use of existing and emerging digital tools and resources in support of student learning.

  • NETS-T 5c
  • SOE 2, 3

 

Deliverables

 

Module One: Computer Ethics and Computers & Education

 EDTC-5900

 

Details

Due

Points

Readings

Stamatellos (Computer Ethics) Chapter 1 and 9

 

Articles and websites made available by Instructor in CANVAS

 

 

Class Activity

Respond to weekly discussion questions provided in class.  (Must be in attendance to earn points)

 

1.25

Graded

Mini-paper:  Write a four-paragraph (minimum) CRITICAL essay on the Frontline episode “Digital Nation”

  • Must be between 500-1000 words
  • APA format

 

10

Module Two: Copyright, Intellectual Property Rights, and Plagiarism

 EDTC-5900

 

Details

Due

Points

Readings

Stamatellos (Computer Ethics) Chapts 4 & 5

 

US Department of Commerce 2013 paper, Copyright Policy, Creativity, and Innovation in the Digital Economy (available in the files in CANVAS

 

Webster University policies on plagiarism

 

 

 

Class Activity

Respond to weekly discussion questions provided in class.  (Must be in attendance to earn points)

 

1.25

Non-Graded

Capstone Project:

  • Basic topic of interest to be approved by Instructor by week 3. 
  • Specifics to be provided by the Instructor and grading rubric.

 

 

 

Module Three: Convergence of Humanity and Machine

 EDTC-5900

 

Details

Due

Points

Readings

Stamatellos (Computer Ethics) Chapter 6

 

Articles and websites made available by Instructor in CANVAS

 

 

 

Class Activity

Respond to weekly discussion questions provided in class.  (Must be in attendance to earn points)

 

1.25

Graded

Mini-paper:  Write a four-paragraph (minimum) CRITICAL essay on the Article provided this week by the Instructor

 

  • Must be between 500-1000 words
  • APA format

 

 

10

Non-Graded

Obtain approval from instructor on the topic of interest for the capstone project.

 

Name of the topic and type of project you want to create ((i.e., Impact of Technology on the Developing child) 

 

 

 

 

 

Module Four: Computer Crime and Security

 EDTC-5900

 

Details

Due

Points

Readings

Stamatellos (Computer Ethics) Chapter 2

 

Articles and websites made available by Instructor in CANVAS

 

 

 

Class Activity

Respond to weekly discussion questions provided in class.  (Must be in attendance to earn points)

 

1.25

Graded

Mini-Project:

Annotated Bibliography

  • Write an annotated bibliography of the research topic
  • Must have 5 to 10 sources

 

 

5

Graded

Mini-paper: Write a four-paragraph (minimum) CRITICAL essay on the Article provided this week by the Instructor

* Must be between 600-1000 words

 

 

10

Module Five: Privacy and Community in Cyberspace

 EDTC-5900

 

Details

Due

Points

Readings

Stamatellos (Computer Ethics) Chapter 3

 

Articles and websites made available by Instructor in CANVAS

 

 

 

Class Activity

Respond to weekly discussion questions provided in class.  (Must be in attendance to earn points)

 

1.25

Graded

Mini-Project:

Create three graphic organizers to plan out your thinking

  • Main Idea
  • Cause and Effect
  • Compare and Contrast

 

Many free tools are available online and word and ppt can create these too.

 

 

 

 

 

5

Module Six: Computers in Entertainment and Politics

 EDTC-5900

 

Details

Due

Points

Readings

Stamatellos (Computer Ethics) Chapter 10 & 11

 

Access Tech Tonic at the Alliance for Childhood. 

(This will also be in the files in CANVAS)

 

 

Class Activity

Respond to weekly discussion questions provided in class.  (Must be in attendance to earn points)

 

1.25

Graded

Mini-Project:

Graphic organizer review-  they will post their graphic organizers from week 5 to a group and peer edit each other’s work and then submit one of their peer edit forms to me as proof.

 

10

Module Seven: Technology Controlling Nature and Man

 EDTC-5900

 

Details

Due

Points

Readings

No readings

 

 

Class Activity

Respond to weekly discussion questions provided in class.  (Must be in attendance to earn points)

 

 

Graded

Mini-Project:

Outline- Final outline of the project on what you will be creating.

 

10

Module Eight: Computers in Business and Health

 EDTC-5900

 

Details

Due

Points

Readings

Stamatellos (Computer Ethics) Chpt 7 & 8

 

 

 

Class Activity

Respond to weekly discussion questions provided in class.  (Must be in attendance to earn points)

 

1.25

Graded

Presentation – capstone project

 

30

 

Evaluation

EVALUATION / GRADING SCALE:

 

      93%-100% = A

      90%-92% = A-

      86%-89% = B+

      83%-85% = B

      80%-82% = B-

      76%-79% = C+

 

Class Discussions/Attendance       10%

Mini-Papers                                 30%

 

Mini-Projects                               30%       

 

Final Project with Presentation      30%

 

 

Course Policies

Attendance

The expectation is that student will attend each session.  If you are going to be absent, you must inform the instructor.  The instructor reserves the right to lower the final grade by a letter grade when 2 unexcused absences are recorded.

 

Students who do not complete the requirements of the course must contact the instructor prior to the end of the course to complete an Incomplete Course form.  Incompletes are not awarded except in emergencies, as defined by the instructor. 

 

NB: An Incomplete may only be awarded to a student who has maintained a passing grade up to the point of the emergency.  Incomplete grades will change to a grade of F or NC unless the requirements stipulated on the incomplete form are met by the date listed on the form or one calendar year from the end of the course, whichever comes first.

Institutional Policies

Academic Policies

Academic policies provide students with important rights and responsibilities.  Students are expected to familiarize themselves with all academic policies that apply to them.  Academic policies for undergraduate students can be found in the Undergraduate Studies Catalog; graduate students should review the Graduate Studies Catalog.

Undergraduate Studies Catalog

The Undergraduate Studies Catalog contains academic policies that apply to all undergraduate students. The academic policies and information section of the catalog contains important information related to attendance, conduct, academic honesty, grades, and more. If you are an undergraduate student, please review the catalog each academic year. The current Undergraduate Studies Catalog is at:

http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/

Graduate Studies Catalog

The Graduate Studies Catalog contains academic policies that apply to all graduate students. The academic policies section of the catalog contains important information related to conduct, academic honesty, grades, and more. If you are a graduate student, please review the catalog each academic year. The current Graduate Studies Catalog is at:

http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/

Grading

The Grades section of the academic catalog outlines the various grading systems courses may use, including the information about the final grade reported for this class.

Undergraduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/academic-policies.html#grading

Graduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/academic-policies.html#grades

Incomplete

There are important policies that govern grades of Incomplete (I), including the circumstances under which Incomplete grades are granted, deadlines for completion, and consequences should the remaining course work not be completed.  It is the responsibility of a student who requests an Incomplete to ensure that he/she understands and follows the policies.

Grade Appeals

Instructors are responsible for assigning grades, and student should discuss grade issues with the instructor. Policies and procedures for appealing grades are available in the appropriate catalog.

Academic Honesty Policy

Webster University is committed to academic excellence. As part of our Statement of Ethics, we strive to preserve academic honor and integrity by repudiating all forms of academic and intellectual dishonesty, including cheating, plagiarism and all other forms of academic dishonesty. Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and is subject to a disciplinary response. Students are encouraged to talk to instructors about any questions they may have regarding how to properly credit others’ work, including paraphrasing, quoting, and citation formatting. The university reserves the right to utilize electronic databases, such as Turnitin.com, to assist faculty and students with their academic work.

The University’s Academic Honesty Policy is published in academic catalogs:

Undergraduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/academic-policies.html

Graduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/academic-policies.html

As a part of the University commitment to academic excellence, the Academic Resource Center provides student resources to become better acquainted with academic honesty and the tools to prevent plagiarism in its many forms:

http://www.webster.edu/arc/plagiarism_prevention/

Statement of Ethics

Webster University strives to be a center of academic excellence. The University makes every effort to ensure the following:

  • The opportunity for students to learn and inquire freely
  • The protection of intellectual freedom and the rights of professors to teach
  • The advancement of knowledge through scholarly pursuits and relevant dialogue

To review Webster University's statement of ethics, see the Undergraduate Studies Catalog and the Graduate and Studies Catalog:

Undergraduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/overview.html#ethics

Graduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/ethics.html

Important Academic Resources

Academic Accommodations

Webster University makes every effort to accommodate individuals with academic/learning, health, physical and psychological disabilities. To obtain accommodations, students must identify themselves and provide documentation from a qualified professional or agency to the appropriate campus designee or the ADA Coordinator at the main campus. The ADA Coordinator may be reached at 314-246-7700 or [email protected].

If you have already identified as a student with a documented disability and are entitled to classroom or testing accommodations, please inform the instructor of the accommodations you will require for this class at the beginning of the course.

Academic Resource Center 

Additional support and resources may be accessed through the Academic Resource Center (ARC). Support and resources include academic counseling, accommodations, assistive technology, peer tutoring, plagiarism prevention, testing center services, and writing coaching. Visit www.webster.edu/arc or Loretto Hall 40 on the main campus for more information.

University Library

Webster University Library is dedicated to supporting the research needs and intellectual pursuits of students throughout the University’s worldwide network. Resources include print and electronic books, journal articles, online databases, DVDs and streaming video, CDs and streaming music, datasets, and other specialized information. Services include providing materials at no cost and research help for basic questions to in-depth exploration of resources. The gateway to all of these resources and services is http://library.webster.edu. For support navigating the library’s resources, see http://libanswers.webster.edu/ for the many ways to contact library staff. We invite students to visit the Library in Webster Groves.

Drops and Withdrawals

Drop and withdrawal policies dictate processes for students who wish to unenroll from a course.  Students must take proactive steps to unenroll; informing the instructor is not sufficient, nor is failing to attend.  In the early days of the term or semester, students may DROP a course with no notation on their student record.  After the DROP deadline, students may WITHDRAW from a course; in the case of a WITHDRAW, a grade of W appears on the student record.  After the WITHDRAW deadline, students may not unenroll from a course.  Policies and a calendar of deadlines for DROP and WITHDRAW are at:

Undergraduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/enrollment.html

Graduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/enrollment.html

Academic Calendar - http://www.webster.edu/academics/academic-calendar/

Current tuition rates, policies, and procedures, including details of pro-rated tuition refunds, are available in the “Tuition, Fees, and Refunds” section of Webster’s Academic Catalogs:

Undergraduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/tuition.html

Graduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/tuition.html

Student Handbook and Other Important Policies

Student handbook and other non-academic policies may apply to you and may impact your experience in this class.  Such policies include the student code of conduct, privacy, technology and communications, and more. Please review the handbook each year and be aware of policies that apply to you.  The handbook is available at: 

http://www.webster.edu/student-handbook/

Sexual Assault, Harassment, and Other Sexual Offenses

Webster University makes every effort to educate the community to prevent sexual assault, harassment, and other sexual offenses from occurring, and is committed to providing support to those affected when this behavior does occur. To access information and resources or to review the Policy on Sexual Assault, Harassment, and Other Sexual Offenses, visit:

http://www.webster.edu/sexual-misconduct/

Research on Human Subjects

The Webster University Institutional Review Committee (IRB) is responsible for the review of all research on human subjects.  The IRB process applies to all Webster University faculty, staff, and students and must be completed prior to any contact with human subjects.  For more information on the IRB, visit:

http://www.webster.edu/irb/index.html

Course Evaluations

At the end of this course, you will have the opportunity to provide feedback about your experience. Your input is extremely valuable to the university, your instructor, and the department that offers this course. Please provide your honest and thoughtful evaluation, as it helps the university to provide the best experience possible for all of its students.

Important Technology Information

Connections Accounts

Webster University provides all students, faculty, and staff with a University email account through Connections. Students are expected to activate their Connections account and regularly check incoming University email. Students may choose to have their University email forwarded to an alternate email address. Connections account holders can call the Help Desk (314-246-5995 or toll free at 1-866-435-7270) for assistance with this setup. Instructions are also provided on the Information Technology website at:

http://www.webster.edu/technology/service-desk/

WorldClassRoom

WorldClassRoom is Webster’s Learning Content Management System (LMS). Your instructor may use WorldClassRoom to deliver important information, to hold class activities, to communicate grades and feedback, and more. WorldClassRoom is available using your Connections ID at:

https://worldclassroom.webster.edu/

Webster Alerts

Webster Alerts is the University's preferred emergency mass notification service, available free to current students, faculty and staff at all US campuses. By registering a valid cell phone number and email address, you will receive urgent campus text, voice mail and email communications. Valuable information concerning a range of incidents affecting you - from weather-related campus closures, class delays and cancellations, to more serious or life-threatening events - are immediately and simultaneously delivered through multiple communication channels. To register for Webster Alerts, visit:

http://www.webster.edu/technology/services/webster-alerts/

School of Education

Vision

“ . . . We all must work to make this world worthy of its children.” (Casals, 1970)

Mission

The School of Education at Webster University provides its students with the knowledge, experiences, and practical tools that help them guide both themselves and others toward lifelong learning. The School of Education is a community of educator-scholars who apply critical reflections and creative energies to enhance learning in schools and other educational settings. The faculty strives to support this community by modeling effective teaching practices based on sound theory and research. Personalized approaches create a challenging, yet supportive environment that permits the risk-taking necessary for learning and growth. The School of Education encourages its faculty and students to work actively toward this end, keeping in mind that action must be rooted in visionary, yet realistic, thinking. This thought and action process underscores the development of an inner-directed self-understanding, an outer-directed global perspective, and an appreciation of human diversity that arises from both.

Theme

Developing a world of learners through knowledge, leadership, and life-long learning.

mandala.jpg

The mandala is a universal design that represents meaning. It appears in children’s early drawings in many cultures and seems a fitting symbol to represent the conceptual schema of the School of Education. The outer circle is the “world of learners” in cultural settings. Each quadrant represents one of the school’s four goals for its candidates: to develop knowledgeable learners, informed instructors, reflective collaborators, and responsive educators. The two axes represent the theme components of knowledge, leadership, and life-long learning. These lines are broken to emphasize the fluid relationship of the goals and integrated concepts.

 

Goals

1.Education candidates will demonstrate knowledge of the subject matter, knowledge of the learner, and knowledge of pedagogy based on inquiry and scholarship.

The knowledgeable learner:

  1. knows content that supports conceptual understanding;
  2. applies tools of inquiry to construct meaningful learning experiences;
  3. identifies developmental factors in student learning; and
  4. understands theoretical principles of effective instruction to plan learning experiences.

2. Education candidates will incorporate multiple assessment and instructional strategies to support effective educational practices based on research and theory.

The informed instructor:

  1. designs curriculum based on students’ prior knowledge, learning styles, strengths, and needs;
  2. understands and uses a range of instructional strategies;
  3. uses a variety of communication modes, media, and technology to support student learning; and
  4. employs a variety of formal and informal assessments to monitor learning and modify instruction.

3. Education candidates will reflect on the roles educators take as leaders of change through collaboration with colleagues, students, and families in schools and communities.

The reflective collaborator:

  1. values and integrates reflection to grow as a professional;
  2. promotes communication and collaboration with colleagues, families, and community leaders;
  3. seeks relationships with families and students to support student learning; and
  4. initiates change that benefits students and their families.

4. Education candidates will demonstrate respect for diversity through responsive teaching and learning that values individual differences.

The responsive educator:

  1. understands and responds appropriately to issues of diversity
  2. acknowledges social and cultural contexts to create effective teaching and learning environments;
  3. adapts instruction to the learner’s knowledge, ability, and background experience; and
  4. identifies resources for specialized services when needed.

 

Dispositions

There are various definitions of dispositions. The dictionary suggests that dispositions are the combination of traits revealed by one’s habitual ways of behaving or thinking. NCATE defines dispositions as “the values, commitments and professional ethics that influence behaviors toward students, families, colleagues, and communities and affect student learning, motivation, and development as well as the educator’s own professional growth. “ (Professional Standards, p. 53) Interpreting and assessing dispositions is often more intuitive than it is descriptive and measurable. Regardless of the difficulty of assessment, there is significant value in focusing attention on qualities that make an effective teacher.

  1. Understands and respects self
  2. Understands and Respects Others
  3. Understands and Respects Professional Communities