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Ft Bliss, TX · College of Arts & Sciences · Professional Counseling

Foundations of Counseling:The Helping Relationship
COUN-5020

  • F1 2019
  • Section 28
  • 3 Credits
  • 08/19/2019 to 10/18/2019
  • Modified 05/01/2019

Meeting Times

Contact Information

Description

This course defines and examines the philosophic bases of counseling and the helping relationship, focusing on the foundational and theoretical concepts necessary for working with individuals, groups, children, and families in a multicultural context.  Students learn to define, generalize, organize, and critique the counseling process and profession including consultation theories, practice, and application in a multicultural society, as well as some crisis and disaster intervention.  Attention is given to the initial development of basic counseling skills, professional identity and counselor roles, related ethics, and client relationships.  Self-growth experiential activities are associated with this course content. 

Content Areas: helping relationships, social and cultural, professional orientation

Outcomes

2009/2016 CACREP Standards* Corresponding Assessments
Understands the history, philosophy, and trends in clinical mental health counseling (CMHC.A.1 CACREP 2009) / History and development of clinical mental health counseling (5.C.1.a. CACREP 2016) Exams; Literature Review; discussions and other class activities
Understands the roles and functions of clinical mental health counselors in various practice settings and the importance of relationships between counselors and other professional, including interdisciplinary treatment teams (CMHC.A.3 CACREP 2009) Exams; LPC Interview and Paper; discussions and other class activities
Strategies for interfacing with integrated behavioral health care professionals (2.C.3.d CACREP 2016) Exams; LPC Interview and Paper; discussions and other class activities
Roles and settings of clinical mental health counselors (5.C.2.a CACREP 2016) Exams; LPC Interview and Paper; discussions and other class activities
Knows the professional organizations, preparation standards, and credentials relevant to the practice of clinical mental health counseling (CMHC.A.4 CACREP 2009; 5.C.2.k CACREP 2016) Exams; Literature Review
Describes the principles of mental health, including prevention, intervention, consultation, education, and advocacy, as well as the operation of programs and networks that promote mental health in a multicultural society (CMHC.C.1 CACREP 2009) Exams; Literature Rreview; LPC Interview and Paper; discussions

Understands the range of mental health service delivery—such as inpatient, outpatient, partial treatment and aftercare—and the clinical mental health counseling services network (CMHC.C.5 CACREP 2009) / Mental health service delivery modalities within the continuum of care, such as inpatient, outpatient, partial treatment and aftercare, and the mental health counseling services networks (5.C.2.c CACREP 2016)

Exams; LPC Interview and Paper; discussions
Understands how living in a multicultural society affects clients who are seeking clinical mental health counseling services (CMHC.E.1 CACREP 2009) Exams; Self-Exploration Paper; Role-Plays
History and philosophy of the counseling profession and its specialty areas (II.G.1.a CACREP 2009; II.F.1.a CACREP 2016) Exams; Literature review; discussions
Professional roles, functions, and relationships with other human service providers, including strategies for interagency/inter-organization collaboration and communications (II.G.1.b CACREP 2009) / The multiple professional roles and functions of counselors across specialty areas, and their relationships with human service and integrated behavioral health care systems, including interagency and interorganizational collaboration and consultation (II.F.1.b CACREP 2016) LPC Interview and Paper; Exams; discussions
Self‐care strategies appropriate to the counselor role (II.G.1.d CACREP 2009; II.F.1.l CACREP 2016) Self-Care Paragraph; PSE; discussions
Professional organizations, including membership benefits, activities, services to members, and current issues (II.G.1.f CACREP 2009; II.F.1.f CACREP 2016) Exams; Literature Review; discussions
Current labor market information relevant to opportunities for practice within the counseling profession (II.F.1.h CACREP 2016) Exams; discussions
Strategies for personal and professional self-evaluation and implications for practice (II.F.1.k CACREP 2016) PSE; discussions
The role of counseling supervision in the profession (II.F.1.m CACREP 2016) PSE; discussions
Counselors’ roles in developing cultural self‐awareness, promoting cultural social justice, advocacy and conflict resolution, and other culturally supported behaviors that promote optimal wellness and growth of the human spirit, mind, or body (II.G.2.e CACREP 2009) Exams; Self-Exploration Paper; discussions
Counselors’ roles in eliminating biases, prejudices, and processes of intentional and unintentional oppression and discrimination (II.G.2.f CACREP 2009) Exams; discussions
An orientation to wellness and prevention as desired counseling goals (II.G.5.a CACREP 2009) Self-Care Paragraph; discussions
Counselor characteristics and behaviors that influence helping processes (II.G.5.b CACREP 2009; II.F.5.f CACREP 2016) Role-Plays; PSE
Essential interviewing and counseling skills (II.G.5.c CACREP 2009; II.F.5.g CACREP 2016) Role-Plays; Interview; PSE

 

* 2009 CACREP standards apply only to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling emphasis at the Webster Groves, MO, campus.

** 2016 CACREP standards apply to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling emphasis actively preparing for CACREP accreditation at the following campuses: Columbia, SC; Charleston, SC; and Myrtle Beach, SC.

While the program is neither CACREP accredited nor actively preparing for accreditation at other campuses, students at other campuses and/or enrolled in other emphases are still held to these standards as these represent best practices in the field of counselor education.

Materials

Counseling Today: Foundations of Professional Identity

  • Author: Granello & Young
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Edition: Most Recent
  • ISBN: 978-0130985361

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association

  • Author: American Psychological Association
  • Edition: 6th
  • ISBN: 978-1433805615

This manual will be used throughout the program.

There may be additional readings handed out or posted on World Classroom during the term.

Deliverables

Midterm and Final Exams

There will be a brief review for each exam.  Make note that exams will cover text content details of which will not necessarily have been reviewed in class.  Students are responsible for understanding all chapter content not just that discussed in class.  Class discussions provide the opportunity to ask questions, gain understanding.  Exams will be a combination of multiple choice, matching, short answer, and essay. 

Each exam is 100 points for a total of 200 points possible on exams.

American Psychological Association (APA) Test

Test will be online or take home.

25 points possible

Self-Exploration/Autobiography Paper

Write 6 pages, double-spaced including cover page (no more no less), exploring your ethnic and cultural background, upbringing, and experiences and/or individuals which/who have shaped you up till today.  Discuss why you have chosen counseling and what you intend to do with this degree.

Content and Format Guidelines for the Self Exploration Paper

  1. Discuss what aspects/qualities of your ethnic/cultural background are prominent in your life (e.g., language, religion, character traits) and the childhood experiences that reinforced them.
  2. Describe the childhood and adolescent experiences or relationships that shaped your view of people who are culturally different than you, including race, ethnicity, age, gender, and disability.  What is your current view of people who are culturally different than you?  Are these current views different from the ones you held while growing up and the ones your surrounding people held?
  3. The cultural values you currently hold (address time, activity, relational, basic human nature, religion).  Where do they come from and why do you hold them?  Are those values different from other people's values you may encounter in practice?
  4. How do you plan to manage value conflicts with your clients?
  5. Describe your process in racial identity development.
  6. What factors/experiences influenced your progression?
  7. How have you been impacted by various “isms” including but not limited to those involving race, color, national origin, citizenship status, creed, religion, religious affiliation, age, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, veteran status, or any other protected status under applicable law?

Reflect upon your life and discuss some of the most important influences on your development, including self-esteem, and self-concept – such as who you are and how you became the person and professional that you are today.  Discuss your worldview and philosophy of life – in other words, what guides (e.g., values, beliefs, practices, etc.) your decisions and behavior?

Organize the paper according to the 7 sections above, i.e., the first paragraph(s) will respond to #1; the second paragraph(s) to #2, etc.  Failure to organize the paper in this format will result in return of the paper for rewriting according to this format with return due to the professor within 48 hours.

30 points possible

Interview and Paper: Interview an LPC

You will locate and interview a local licensed professional counselor who works with a population you want to work with and write up your findings.  We will develop the interview questions in class.  Resulting paper will be in APA Style and will be 3-4 pages, including cover page, no more or less.

Content and Guidelines for the LPC Interview & Typescript

  • Interview an LPC (not LPCA, LCSW, etc.)
  • Interview to be minimum of 20 minutes, max of 30
  • Use active listening skills
    • These will be graded for skill (i.e., paraphrasing and reflection with affect)
  • Tape the session
  • Type out the interview verbatim
  • Conclude with a paragraph regarding your active listening skills and another paragraph(s) with your thoughts on the field as related to the responses provided by the LPC
  • Turn in the tape with the typescript and conclusion
  • Use of APA on cover sheet only

30 points possible

Professional Skills Evaluation (PSE)

The Professional Skills Evaluation (PSE) will be used in this course for ethical and regular evaluation of professional counseling skills development.  This form was developed based on proficiencies necessary to succeed in the field of professional counseling and aligns with ACA Code of Ethics (2014), ASCA Ethical Standards for School Counselors (2016), professional standards (CACREP, 2009/2016), and state regulatory boards.  It will be administered to all students in this course at the end term.  The professional judgment of the instructor is used in the administration of the PSE; the instructor’s subjective and professional opinion is inherent in this process and is considered mandatory.  Students evidencing deficiencies in course related skills may be required to meet with the instructor outside of class time.  Confidentiality will occur throughout this process; however, PSE’s will be filed in students’ files and may be reviewed at a later date by program faculty for comparison of development of counseling and interpersonal skills, adherence to ethical code and conduct, integration of multicultural awareness, openness to supervision, use of ethical conduct, etc.

The PSE is an integral part of the evaluation of student competencies and is taken very seriously by the counseling faculty.  This assessment is critical in the evaluation of the student’s skills and dispositions toward counseling. Therefore, it is possible for a student to do well on other assessment measures and still fail the course if the PSE indicates a number of problem areas in the student’s development as a professional counselor.

200 points possible for an end term PSE

The PSE form is available in the Counseling Student Handbook.

Literature Review

Using APA style (6th ed.), write a 6-8 page (not including the cover, abstract page and reference list), double-spaced paper on a counseling related topic that has multiculturalism or social justice/advocacy as its foundation.  See the Literature Review Guidelines. 

Writing a literature review in COUN 5020 serves three purposes: a) to introduce you to the scholarly counseling literature; b) to provide a vehicle through which to learn library resources to access and obtain information; and c) to gain experience reading, integrating, and applying scholarly information to a specific problem or question. The goal of your paper should be to review and evaluate the relevant scholarly knowledge about a counseling related topic that has multiculturalism or social justice/advocacy as its foundation. 

All of the below will be graded on:

APA format details to include:

  • Define theme or problem
  • Use of subheadings
  • Use of third person and past tense
  • Appropriate citation of references throughout and in reference section
  • Clarity of statements, fully developed ideas
  • Counseling literature used (relevance of literature used to counseling field)
  • Identify relations, contradictions, gaps, and inconsistencies in the literature
  • Conclusion (v summary)

Other Competency in Grad level Writing Points:

  • Use of opening and closing sentences
  • Grammar and punctuation
  • Overall organization and following stated instructions

Tips: do not use “therapy”, use “counseling”; do not use “not only…but…”; do not use “since” unless talking about time; do not use “as well as”, use ‘and’.

Paper Format

  • Title Page: a standard APA style title page.
  • Abstract: a brief, comprehensive summary of contents of the paper.
  • Introduction: a statement of the issue or problem under consideration and the purpose of focus of the literature review.  This section should introduce the topic to the reader and give the reader an overview of what to expect in the paper.
  • Body of Paper: you should organize all the relevant literature into a logical, cohesive format. 
  • Conclusion: include the author's conclusions about the reviewed literature.  What are the strengths and weaknesses of this body of research?  What are directions for future research?  Are there needs related to counselor training?  Are there implications for counseling practice, etc.?
  • References: APA style. Must reference a minimum of 4 peer reviewed professional counseling journals—counseling not psychology, social work, etc.

References

The paper should include as many references as is necessary to sufficiently cover the topic.  A minimum of 12 references is required.  You must have at least 4 references that are peer reviewed counseling journal articles; the rest of the references may be books (scholarly books, NOT self-help books).  Magazines and newspapers are not acceptable sources of information; neither are web pages.  If you have questions about whether you have enough references, consult the instructor early in the term.  Some peer reviewed counseling journals include: Journal of Counseling and Development, Journal of Specialists in Group Work, The School Counselor, Journal of Counseling and Supervision, Journal of Mental Health Counseling, Journal of Family Therapy.  The key to locating professional counseling journals is to be familiar with the ACA published journals and to read them.  A list can be found at www.counseling.org

Evaluation

See rubric in "additional items" section of syllabus.

Specific guidelines to follow

  • Do not use first person.  This is an objective review of the literature.  To be a review of the literature, it will include support for the topic and views that oppose the topic.
  • Include a paragraph at the beginning of the paper that defines the importance of the topic in the field of counseling.
  • Also include an early paragraph that defines how the paper is organized (this will orient the reader as to what to expect).
  • Use headings! These will greatly help you to organize your paper and they will help the reader comprehend the topics.
  • Use proper grammar including opening sentences and closing sentences that transition the reader to the next paragraph.
  • Use complete sentences and not run-on sentences.
  • Remember that this paper is in essay form, not an annotated list.
  • Emphasize findings of studies, not methodologies or the names of variables studied.
  • Point out trends or themes in the literature that you have reviewed.
  • Point out gaps in the literature.  What are important things that we do not yet know?
  • Point out weaknesses in the research that you are summarizing.  Be critical in your reading – don’t just summarize
  • Use direct quotes very sparingly, if at all.
  • You should have at least one reference cited per paragraph, and often you will have more than one.  Sometimes you will have numerous sentences in a row that each have a citation.

50 points possible

Students are responsible for reading The APA Publication Manual on their own time. This is a text that students need to be very familiar with throughout the program—do not put off learning APA Style.

Self-Care Activity and Paragraph

Burnout is a common occurrence in mental health professionals who do not practice some form of self-care.  Self-care practices include weekly (or more) occurrences of focused, purposeful mind and body relaxation by the student counselor in which the student intentionally connects relaxation of the body with relaxation of the mind.  The practice of relaxation is meant to de-stress from the clinical experience as well as train your body to remain calm in stressful situations thereby enabling you to destabilize a situation.  It is also models appropriate responses for the client.  Examples of self-care include but are not limited to breathe work, meditation, prayer, fictional reading, and visualization.  Note that exercise, while increasing endorphins in the body, should be in addition to a relaxation practice and not in place of.  Note that watching TV and or entertaining with family, while important is not a self-care strategy.  You will implement a preferred self-care strategy throughout this term and write a paragraph at the end of the term regarding what you learned about yourself from practicing the technique in addition to how it worked for you and or what you would change about it if it did not work for you. 

25 points possible

Participation and Attendance

Note that participation includes being present in class in addition to speaking in every class session.  Your comments evidence your reading.  Participate.  Note also that it is possible to attend all class sessions but receive a significantly lowered grade if your skills are not developing, and or you are not actively speaking in class.   You may evidence competent skills but lack of participation, attendance, and or reading may fail you.  Participation in all class sessions is critical considering the accelerated format of this program and the fact that counseling is an inter-relational profession. Participation will include participation in all online activities, including discussions and other activities.   Absences and lack of speaking in class will affect your final grade.  Note that it is common for students who do not openly participate every class period to receive a lowered grade for the course. Please see the Participation and Attendance Course policy later in this syllabus for more details.

100 points total for participation.

In-class Experiential Training Lab

Participate in in-class experiential training exercises/activities, i.e., skills practice dyads.  Approximately one-three hours of most class periods will be dedicated time to development of basic counselor skills (e.g., empathy, unconditional positive regard, paraphrasing, reflection with emotion, and congruence) and discussion regarding personal biases. 

Additional Course Requirements

There will be additional course requirements regarding video review and posts online.  The grading of these will be part of your participation grade.

ALL WRITTEN PROJECTS/ACTIVITIES ARE TO BE SUBMITTED IN ELECTRONIC FORM TO ARRIVE IN THE INSTRUCTOR'S EMAIL BY 5:30PM ON THE DUE DATE.  A PAPER COPY SHOULD BE TURNED IN AT CLASS.  NO EXCUSES—PREPARE.  If you do not have access to a home computer, use those situated in the library or find access to a working computer.

Evaluation

Criteria

Types of evaluations and related weights
Type Weight Topic Notes
Exam 100 points Midterm Exam
Exam 100 points Final Exam
Exam 25 points American Psychological Association (APA) Test
Paper 30 points Self-Exploration/Autobiography Paper
Interview and Paper 30 points Interview an LPC
Professional Skills Evaluation (PSE) 200 points Development of course-related clinical and interpersonal skills as measured by the PSE
Paper 50 points Literature Review
Paper 25 points Self-Care Activity and Paragraph
Participation 100 points Class and Online Participation
TOTAL 660 points

Passing is 448 points or 80%

Breakdown

Note that it is possible to write well and attend all class sessions but fail the course. Also note that you may evidence competent skills but lack of participation, attendance, and writing skills may fail you.

Resulting grade and related performance levels
Grade Range Notes
A 94 - 100%
A- 90 - <94%
B+ 87 - <90%
B 84 - <87%
B- 80 - < 84%
C 70 - <80%
F 0 - <70%

Schedule

Course calendar and related activities
When Topic Notes
Week 1
 
  • Syllabus review
  • Break into practice dyads to talk about topics for Literature Review
  • Preliminary approval of Literature Review topic
  • Discussion of chapters 1-3
  • APA and Cognitive Complexity
  • Use of library online services
  • Experiential training

Readings for this week: chapters 1, 2, 3; Counselor wellness article

Assignments and activities: begin working on self-exploration paper and search for or make an appointment with an LPC.

Week 2
 
  • Discussion of Chapter 4-5
  • Break into practice dyads, talk about topics for Literature Review
  • Preliminary Approval of Literature Review topic
  • Experiential training

Reading for this week: chapters 4-5

Week 3
 
  • Discussion of chapters 6
  • Break into dyads to discuss completed self-exploration paper
  • Final approval of lit review topic
  • Discussion of references and reference page
  • Development of questions for LPC interview
  • Experiential training

Reading for this week: chapters 6

Assignments and activities: Self-Exploration/Autobiography Paper due

Week 4
 
  • Discuss chapter 7
  • Exam review
  • Experiential training

Reading for this week: chapter 7

Assignments and activities: APA exam; and Literature Review Reference page sample

Week 5
 
  • Midterm exam (Exam will be online and will be open for one week) Note: exam covers chapters 1-7)
  • Discuss chapters 8
  • Experiential training

Reading for this week: Study chapters 1-7; Read Chapter 8

Midterm exam

Week 6
 
  • Discussion chapters 9-10
  • Experiential training
  • Individual discussions of any PSE concerns

Reading for this week: Chapters 9-10

Week 7
 
  • Discussion of chapters 11-12
  • Experiential training

Reading for this week: chapters 11-12

Assignments and activities: LPC Interview and Paper due

Week 8
 
  • Discuss chapters 13-14
  • Experiential training
  • Final exam review

Reading for this week: chapters 13-14

Week 9
 
  • Reflection & closing day
  • Final exam (covers chapters 8-14)
  • PSE final meetings following individual completion of exam

Due this week: final exam, Self-Care Paragraph, Literature Review

Course Policies

Expectations for writing competency

Writing competency is important in graduate school.   As a graduate student and counselor in training, you have a responsibility to the profession and those you will be representing/serving to write professionally.  Take this task seriously and consult the Academic Resource Center or enroll in a writing course if you are told you need assistance on writing assignments. The grade penalty will be heavy for lack of simple proofing of grammar, spelling, and APA formatting on all assignments. Please consult the rubric in the syllabus for specific grading impact.

Subjective aspect of grading

The grading of this course includes a subjective component to it based upon the professional experience and expertise of the instructor.  The Counseling faculty recognize that counseling skills, counselor effectiveness, and professionalism cannot be assessed in the same manner as academic performance in typical university coursework. Students completing this course should demonstrate marked progress toward the course objectives as noted above as well as be able to write coherently about counseling theories and techniques. Your final grade in this course will reflect not only your academic performance but also your counseling and interpersonal skill development as evaluated by the instructor. It is possible to excel academically and receive a less than satisfactory final grade.  Thus, all grades will reflect a combination of objective and subjective assessment.

Self-awareness, safety of disclosure, appropriate interpersonal skills and ACA Code of Ethics

This course is taught in a manner that provides a safe, welcoming and inclusive environment for students of all racial, ethnic, gender identities and variances, sexual orientations, economic classes, ages, ability statuses, and religions. Students are encouraged to use language and communication that is respectful and culturally appropriate.

In the interaction between class members, self-disclosure and personal examination will occur. All interactions fall under the same umbrella of confidentiality as do client/counselor relationships, i.e., what is discussed in the class stays in the class and is not discussed with other students outside of the course or friends.   We will be learning from each other in addition to the texts throughout the semester. Therefore, it is important that everyone feels safe, comfortable, and free to discuss and elaborate on their thoughts around their developing knowledge and skills.  In class, it is important for each of us to be respectful of one another’s positions; relating to others in an empathic manner occurs in class just as with clients. You are encouraged to make your feelings and thoughts known, yet, to do so in a “counselor manner”, i.e., respecting the position of listener while giving voice to your thoughts and using your budding counselor attending skills.  This is an opportunity for you to practice and evidence your basic skills of empathy, warmth, genuineness, and congruence by communicating in a manner consistent with a good counselor.  The building of trusting alliances with your classmates is as important as doing so with your clients.  Therefore, you will be practicing some of the same skills when participating in class as in counseling sessions with your clients one day.

Further, openness to supervision and instruction by the faculty (or site supervisor) is an important element of counselor development.  Openness to supervision is defined as: accepting supervision—both individual and in class; recognizing your own personal strengths, weaknesses, biases, needs, and beliefs and agreeing to adapt them to fit in the profession; sensing personal and professional impact on others, both positive and negative; accepting and applying feedback from instructor; being proactive in seeking out needed experiences, feedback, etc.; and accepting feedback in a non-defensive manner with a professional attitude. Students who do not evidence openness to supervision and or appropriate interpersonal skills are subject to remediation by the Counseling Advisory Committee at the campus.  See the student handbook and or catalog for further detail.

 

ACA Code of Ethics (2014)

Counselors [Counselors-in-training] have a responsibility to read, understand, and follow the ACA Code of Ethics and adhere to applicable laws and regulations (see C.1.). Students and supervisees have a responsibility to understand and follow the ACA Code of Ethics. Students and supervisees have the same obligation to clients as those required of professional counselors (see F.5.a.).

Use of Personal Electronic Devices

Turn off all cell phones during class unless otherwise advised by the instructor. Absolutely no: texting, taking of calls, emailing, unauthorized web activity, or social media use during class.  If you have a potential emergency brewing during class time and need to be available by cell (sick child, dying relative, suicidal client) you are required to notify instructor at the beginning of class and take any call outside of class.  More than one of these events will require a personal meeting with the instructor scheduled for non-class time.    

Institutional Policies

Academic Policies

Academic policies provide students with important rights and responsibilities.  Students are expected to familiarize themselves with all academic policies that apply to them.  Academic policies for undergraduate students can be found in the Undergraduate Studies Catalog; graduate students should review the Graduate Studies Catalog.

Undergraduate Studies Catalog

The Undergraduate Studies Catalog contains academic policies that apply to all undergraduate students. The academic policies and information section of the catalog contains important information related to attendance, conduct, academic honesty, grades, and more. If you are an undergraduate student, please review the catalog each academic year. The current Undergraduate Studies Catalog is at:

http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/

Graduate Studies Catalog

The Graduate Studies Catalog contains academic policies that apply to all graduate students. The academic policies section of the catalog contains important information related to conduct, academic honesty, grades, and more. If you are a graduate student, please review the catalog each academic year. The current Graduate Studies Catalog is at:

http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/

Grading

The Grades section of the academic catalog outlines the various grading systems courses may use, including the information about the final grade reported for this class.

Undergraduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/academic-policies.html#grading

Graduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/academic-policies.html#grades

Incomplete

There are important policies that govern grades of Incomplete (I), including the circumstances under which Incomplete grades are granted, deadlines for completion, and consequences should the remaining course work not be completed.  It is the responsibility of a student who requests an Incomplete to ensure that he/she understands and follows the policies.

Grade Appeals

Instructors are responsible for assigning grades, and student should discuss grade issues with the instructor. Policies and procedures for appealing grades are available in the appropriate catalog.

Academic Honesty Policy

Webster University is committed to academic excellence. As part of our Statement of Ethics, we strive to preserve academic honor and integrity by repudiating all forms of academic and intellectual dishonesty, including cheating, plagiarism and all other forms of academic dishonesty. Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and is subject to a disciplinary response. Students are encouraged to talk to instructors about any questions they may have regarding how to properly credit others’ work, including paraphrasing, quoting, and citation formatting. The university reserves the right to utilize electronic databases, such as Turnitin.com, to assist faculty and students with their academic work.

The University’s Academic Honesty Policy is published in academic catalogs:

Undergraduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/academic-policies.html

Graduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/academic-policies.html

As a part of the University commitment to academic excellence, the Academic Resource Center provides student resources to become better acquainted with academic honesty and the tools to prevent plagiarism in its many forms:

http://www.webster.edu/arc/plagiarism_prevention/

Statement of Ethics

Webster University strives to be a center of academic excellence. The University makes every effort to ensure the following:

  • The opportunity for students to learn and inquire freely
  • The protection of intellectual freedom and the rights of professors to teach
  • The advancement of knowledge through scholarly pursuits and relevant dialogue

To review Webster University's statement of ethics, see the Undergraduate Studies Catalog and the Graduate and Studies Catalog:

Undergraduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/overview.html#ethics

Graduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/ethics.html

Important Academic Resources

Academic Accommodations

Webster University makes every effort to accommodate individuals with academic/learning, health, physical and psychological disabilities. To obtain accommodations, students must identify themselves and provide documentation from a qualified professional or agency to the appropriate campus designee or the Academic ADA Coordinator at the main campus. The Academic ADA Coordinator may be reached at 314-246-7700 or [email protected].

If you have already identified as a student with a documented disability and are entitled to classroom or testing accommodations, please inform the instructor of the accommodations you will require for this class at the beginning of the course.

Academic Resource Center 

Additional support and resources may be accessed through the Academic Resource Center (ARC). Support and resources include academic counseling, accommodations, assistive technology, peer tutoring, plagiarism prevention, testing center services, and writing coaching. Visit www.webster.edu/arc or Loretto Hall 40 on the main campus for more information.

Student Success Portal

Webster University’s Student Success Portal, powered by Starfish, is a communications tool to connect students with faculty members and campus support services. It allows faculty and staff members to communicate with you regarding academic achievements as well as areas where support may be helpful.  You may use the portal to contact faculty and staff members for assistance and to arrange meetings.  Activity in the portal will be communicated to your Webster University email account.  The Student Success Portal is available via your course home page in WorldClassRoom or via Connections.  Learn more about the Student Success Portal at http://www.webster.edu/success/students.html.

University Library

Webster University Library is dedicated to supporting the research needs and intellectual pursuits of students throughout the University’s worldwide network. Resources include print and electronic books, journal articles, online databases, DVDs and streaming video, CDs and streaming music, datasets, and other specialized information. Services include providing materials at no cost and research help for basic questions to in-depth exploration of resources. The gateway to all of these resources and services is http://library.webster.edu. For support navigating the library’s resources, see http://libanswers.webster.edu/ for the many ways to contact library staff. 

Drops and Withdrawals

Drop and withdrawal policies dictate processes for students who wish to unenroll from a course.  Students must take proactive steps to unenroll; informing the instructor is not sufficient, nor is failing to attend.  In the early days of the term or semester, students may DROP a course with no notation on their student record.  After the DROP deadline, students may WITHDRAW from a course; in the case of a WITHDRAW, a grade of W appears on the student record.  After the WITHDRAW deadline, students may not unenroll from a course.  Policies and a calendar of deadlines for DROP and WITHDRAW are at:

Undergraduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/enrollment.html

Graduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/enrollment.html

Academic Calendar - http://www.webster.edu/academics/academic-calendar/

Current tuition rates, policies, and procedures, including details of pro-rated tuition refunds, are available in the “Tuition, Fees, and Refunds” section of Webster’s Academic Catalogs:

Undergraduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/tuition.html

Graduate
http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/tuition.html

Student Handbook and Other Important Policies

Student handbook and other non-academic policies may apply to you and may impact your experience in this class.  Such policies include the student code of conduct, privacy, technology and communications, and more. Please review the handbook each year and be aware of policies that apply to you.  The handbook is available at: 

http://www.webster.edu/student-handbook/

Sexual Assault, Harassment, and Other Sexual Offenses

Webster University makes every effort to educate the community to prevent sexual assault, harassment, and other sexual offenses from occurring, and is committed to providing support to those affected when this behavior does occur. To access information and resources or to review the Policy on Sexual Assault, Harassment, and Other Sexual Offenses, visit:

http://www.webster.edu/sexual-misconduct/

Research on Human Subjects

The Webster University Institutional Review Committee (IRB) is responsible for the review of all research on human subjects.  The IRB process applies to all Webster University faculty, staff, and students and must be completed prior to any contact with human subjects.  For more information on the IRB, visit:

http://www.webster.edu/irb/index.html

Course Evaluations

At the end of this course, you will have the opportunity to provide feedback about your experience. Your input is extremely valuable to the university, your instructor, and the department that offers this course. Please provide your honest and thoughtful evaluation, as it helps the university to provide the best experience possible for all of its students.

Important Technology Information

Connections Accounts

Webster University provides all students, faculty, and staff with a University email account through Connections. Students are expected to activate their Connections account and regularly check incoming University email. Students may choose to have their University email forwarded to an alternate email address. Connections account holders can call the Help Desk (314-246-5995 or toll free at 1-866-435-7270) for assistance with this setup. Instructions are also provided on the Information Technology website at:

http://www.webster.edu/technology/service-desk/

WorldClassRoom

WorldClassRoom is Webster’s Learning Content Management System (LMS). Your instructor may use WorldClassRoom to deliver important information, to hold class activities, to communicate grades and feedback, and more. WorldClassRoom is available using your Connections ID at:

https://worldclassroom.webster.edu/

Webster Alerts

Webster Alerts is the University's preferred emergency mass notification service, available free to current students, faculty and staff at all US campuses. By registering a valid cell phone number and email address, you will receive urgent campus text, voice mail and email communications. Valuable information concerning a range of incidents affecting you - from weather-related campus closures, class delays and cancellations, to more serious or life-threatening events - are immediately and simultaneously delivered through multiple communication channels. To register for Webster Alerts, visit:

http://www.webster.edu/technology/services/webster-alerts/

Campus Information

Additional Items

Rubric for Self-Exploration Paper

Grading criteria Fails to meet criteria at program level Minimally meets criteria at program level Meets criteria at program level

Exceeds criteria at program level

Score/Level

Content Knowledge:

30%

The project contains little or no evidence that the student has read, viewed, and understood the project; and or did not follow directions. The project contains minimal evidence that the student has read, viewed, and understood the project and or followed directions. The project contains sufficient evidence that the student has read, viewed, and understood the project and or followed directions. The project contains substantial evidence that the student has read, viewed, and understood the project and or followed directions.  

Personal Awareness:

40%

The response is weakly or mostly unrelated to the subject matter of the assignment. The response is loosely related to the subject matter of the assignment. The response is directly related to the subject matter of the assignment. The response is expertly crafted to relate to the subject matter of the assignment.  

Quality of Writing:

30%

Writing is significantly below graduate-level writing expectations; uses unclear and inappropriate language; and/or has many errors in spelling, grammar, and syntax. Writing is minimally satisfactory for graduate-level writing expectations; occasionally uses unclear and inappropriate language; and/or has a few errors in spelling, grammar, and syntax. Writing is satisfactory for graduate-level writing expectations; uses clear and appropriate language; and/or has no errors in spelling, grammar, and syntax. Writing is excellent for graduate-level writing expectations; and/or the paper: uses very clear and appropriate language; and/or has no errors in spelling, grammar, and syntax    

 

Rubric for LPC Interview

Grading Criteria

Fails to meet criteria at program level Minimally meets criteria at program level Meets criteria at program level Exceeds criteria at program level

Score/Level

Content Knowledge: 

30%

The project contains little or no evidence that the student has read, viewed, and understood the project; and or did not follow directions. The project contains minimal evidence that the student has read, viewed, and understood the project and or followed directions. The project contains sufficient evidence that the student has read, viewed, and understood the project and or followed directions. The project contains substantial evidence that the student has read, viewed, and understood the project and or followed directions.  

Personal Awareness: 

30%

Related conclusion is weakly or mostly unrelated to the subject matter of the assignment.  Related conclusion is loosely related to the subject matter of the assignment. Related conclusion is directly related to the subject matter of the assignment. Related conclusion is expertly crafted to relate to the subject matter of the assignment.  

Skills Development:

40%

Active listening is significantly below average first class student; and/or uses unclear and unprofessional language/grammar. Active listening is minimally satisfactory for first class student expectations; occasionally uses unclear and unprofessional language/grammar. Active listening is satisfactory for first class student expectations; uses clear and professional language/grammar. Active listening is excellent for first class student expectations; and/or the uses very clear and professional language/grammar.  

Rubric for Literature Review

Standard Fails to meet criteria at program level Minimally meets criteria at program level Meets criteria a program level Exceeds criteria at program level Score/ Level

Responsiveness:

50%

 

The student failed to respond to the requirements of the assignment; and/or the response is weakly or mostly unrelated to the subject matter of the assignment.

The student minimally responded to the requirements of the assignment; and/or the response is loosely related to the subject matter of the assignment.  The student responded to the requirements of the assignment in a comprehensive manner; and/or the response is directly related to the subject matter of the assignment.  The student responded to the requirements of the assignment in a outstanding manner; and/or the response is expertly crafted to relate to the subject matter of the assignment.  

Content Knowledge:

25%

The project contains little or no evidence that the student has read, viewed, and understood the assignment; and/or the assignment demonstrates a lack of understanding and application of the concepts and issues presented in the chosen subject area; and/or application is inaccurate and contains many omissions and/or errors; and/or no examples or irrelevant examples; and/or no thought-provoking ideas or original thinking; and/or no critical thinking; and/or many critical errors when applying knowledge, skills, or strategies for the subject matter. The project contains minimal evidence that the student has read, viewed, and understood the assignment; and/or the assignment demonstrates a basic understanding and application of the concepts and issues presented in the chosen subject area; and/or application is mostly correct, but contains some omissions and/or errors; and/or minimal examples or irrelevant examples; and/or minimal thought-provoking ideas or original thinking; and/or minimal critical thinking; and/or some critical errors when applying knowledge, skills, or strategies for the subject matter. The project contains sufficient evidence that the student has read, viewed, and understood the assignment; and/or the assignment demonstrates an understanding and application of the concepts and issues presented in the chosen subject area; and/or application is accurate and contains few omissions and/or errors; and/or some relevant examples; and/or thought-provoking ideas and original thinking; and/or evidence of critical thinking; and/or no critical errors when applying knowledge, skills, or strategies for the subject matter. The project contains substantial evidence that the student has read, viewed, and understood the assignment; and/or the assignment demonstrates a comprehensive understanding and application of the concepts and issues presented in the chosen subject area; and/or application is insightful and contains no omissions and/or errors; and/or has several  relevant examples; and/or thought-provoking ideas and original thinking; and/or significant evidence of critical thinking; and/or no critical errors when applying knowledge, skills, or strategies for the subject matter.  

Quality of Writing:

10%

Writing is significantly below graduate-level writing expectations; and/or the paper: uses unclear and inappropriate language; and/or has many errors in spelling, grammar, and syntax; and/or lacks organization; and/or fails to follow APA documentation protocol. Writing is minimally satisfactory for graduate-level writing expectations; and/or the paper: occasionally uses unclear and inappropriate language; and/or has a few errors in spelling, grammar, and syntax; and/or has poor organization; and/or minimally follows APA documentation protocol. Writing is satisfactory for graduate-level writing expectations; and/or the paper: uses clear and appropriate language; and/or has no errors in spelling, grammar, and syntax; and/or has good organization; and/or follows APA documentation protocol. Writing is excellent for graduate-level writing expectations; and/or the paper: uses very clear and appropriate language; and/or has no errors in spelling, grammar, and syntax; and/or has excellent organization; and/or follows APA documentation protocol expertly.  

Research, Scholarship, and Professional Style:

15%

The paper is significantly below graduate-level expectations for research, scholarship, and professional style. The assignment the sources fail to conform to APA form and style standards. The paper minimally meets graduate-level expectations for research, scholarship, and professional style. The assignment demonstrates some insight on the content area; and/or the sources mostly conform to APA form and style standards. The paper meets graduate-level expectations for research, scholarship, and professional style. The assignment demonstrates insight on the content area; and/or the sources conform to APA form and style standards. The paper exceeds graduate-level expectations for research, scholarship, and professional style. The assignment demonstrates significant and holistic insight on the content area; and/or the sources expertly conform to APA form and style standards.